1. Remove the top soil/turf layer from an area about 3 feet square and set aside
2. Loosen the soil in the area and remove roots of any pre-existing plants

1. Remove the top soil/turf layer from an area about 3 feet square and set aside 2. Loosen the soil in the area and remove roots of any pre-existing plants

3. Add leaves, wood chips, and twigs to the loosened soil

3. Add leaves, wood chips, and twigs to the loosened soil

4. Cover the pile with the removed topsoil and pack it lightly.

4. Cover the pile with the removed topsoil and pack it lightly.

5. Dress the bump with a couple of logs which beetles and other species can shelter underneath

5. Dress the bump with a couple of logs which beetles and other species can shelter underneath

Supporting the Food Chain - Building a Beetle Bump!

I write a lot (as do others) about the importance of native plants in supporting pollinators. This of course then supports birds and other invertebrates and small mammals that eat those insects and so on up the food chain. But the November 2017 issue of Gardener’s World carried this concept even further and provided directions for building what they called a Beetle Bump!

In a way what they describe is building a compost pile of logs, wood chips and leaves. This will attract its own population of what Gardening World calls detritivores, which are simply animals that feed on dead plant material. Creating this little mini-habitat will provide food for birds and other predators that will also go after garden pests and making your garden that much healthier without pesticides!

This would be a fun project to plan for the spring if you have a budding naturalist in the family! My little great-nephew loves turning over logs and looking for “roly-polys” and I love his excitement about finding them! I’ll have to build him one of these in his yard!

  1. Remove the top soil/turf layer from an area about 3 feet square and set aside
  2. Loosen the soil in the area and remove roots of any pre-existing plants
  3. Add leaves, wood chips, and twigs to the loosened soil
  4. Cover the pile with the removed topsoil and pack it lightly.
  5. Dress the bump with a couple of logs which beetles and other species can shelter underneath

From Gardener’s World magazine, November 2017. Pg. 104